Tagged with Terminal Awards

Winners of the 13 – 14 Terminal Awards

Juror Greg J. Smith  has selected proposals from four artists for the 2013 – 2014 Terminal Awards. Projects by Gottfried Haider, Josh Hite, Frederick Witold Ostrenko, and Atif Akin were selected.

 

Juror Statement

In selecting the 2013 Terminal Awards recipients, proposals were evaluated based on the provocativeness and clarity of project outlines, the strength of related past work and the manner in which proposals directly engaged the internet, as a medium. The four selected proposals are listed below.

Gottfried Haider’s “Drawing Circuits” playfully proposes a rudimentary browser to 3D milling machine workflow through which visitors to a website can draw electronic circuits and then manufacture them. In conflating the sketchpad and the electronic enthusiast’s workbench this project promises to create both a social space and an educational tool.

Frederick Witold Ostrenko’s “Conglomeration” is a sharp critique of the carnivorous capitalism of Silicon Valley that will transform the logic of a crude game prototype into a First-person shooter (FPS). Ostrenko’s proposed game riffs on the informatics of gaming and the ubiquitous data streams and visualizations of financial markets.

Rather than plug work into the tedious trappings of stock web portfolio templates, Atif Akin’s “The Mutant Space” proposes a sincere rethinking of online photo archives. Utilizing Processing.js and experimenting with the capabilities of modern web browsers, this work promises to construct a dynamic space to exhibit the eerie non-place qualities of a collection of photographs documenting urban environments, frozen in time by the Chernobyl meltdown.

Delving into the world of vernacular video, Josh Hite promises to stitch together a video comprised of footage of ‘trundling’ – the rolling of rocks and boulders down hillsides. Curating a meditation on the essential qualities of landscape through YouTube footage might seem counterintuitive, but Hite’s past work demonstrates his capacity to identify and foreground strange idiosyncrasies and patterns, culled from the natural world.

Greg J. Smith February 2013

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Terminal Award: The Poor House Project by Angela Watters

Angela Watters - Terminal

 

launch The Poor House Project

Terminal and the Center of Excellence in the Creative Arts at Austin Peay State University are pleased to announce the launch of The Poor House Project by Angela Watters. Watters is a recipient of a 2012 – 2013 Terminal Award. The Terminal Award is granted annually to four artists to help in the creation of new internet based artworks.

 

The Poor House is a participatory art project organized by artist, Angela Watters.  Currently, the project is accepting submissions of student loan debt numbers from arts graduates. In the coming months personal invitations will be sent to well-known artists requesting a donation of a small work of art to decorate the interior of the gallery like interior of a $5 flea market dollhouse, or the Poor House, which will be transformed into a sculpture offered to collectors at the amount of collected student loan debt. The Poor House Project website compares debt collected with realized prices of paintings sold at auction. As the debt totals rise, the featured painting on the home page will change to a painting sold for a comparable amount.

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Terminal Award: Chastity by Angela Washko

Angela Washko - Terminal

 

project site

 

Terminal and the Center of Excellence in the Creative Arts at Austin Peay State University are pleased to announce the launch of Chastity and The Council on Gender Sensitivity and Behavioral Awareness in World of Warcraft by Angela Washko. Washko is the recipient of a 2012 – 2013 Terminal Award. The Terminal Award is granted annually to four artists to help in the creation of new internet based artworks.

 

 

ARTIST STATEMENT
Angela Washko

Mobilizing communities and using play, I am an artist and facilitator creating new forums for discussions of feminism where and when they do not exist. These forums are created through actions, interventions, videos, and performances- sometimes in video games. I am dedicated to researching and ultimately changing unhealthy, unrealistic, limited, and object-oriented projections of women throughout different forms of media by creating public works that challenge our implicit acceptance of everyday inequality.

My most recent project, “The Council on Gender Sensitivity and Behavioral Awareness In World of Warcraft,” is a long-term research-based initiative I launched to create spaces for dialogue about feminism inside a video game with a community that is notoriously misogynistic and aggressive toward women. I am interested in the unusual political space that evolves within WoW. It takes quite a lot of effort to ever break into the social aspects of the game. One has to make a fairly serious commitment to the game (undergoing lengthy tutorials, quests, learning characters’ skills, finding equipment, fighting dragons/goblins etc.) to ever make it to the point where they are in a guild and regularly communicating with large groups of people. Because of that barrier between the committed and the dabblers, a unique social community is created in each realm of World of Warcraft that few know about, despite the game’s widespread popularity. The blatant discrimination, homophobia, and extreme sexism that persist are not a result of the developers’ aesthetics, but the community of avatar-hidden individuals that play it. I am creating videos from performances inside of World of Warcraft that investigate the relationship between female players and the intensely complex social communities within WOW. I am working on instituting a system in which players in my community are forced to take responsibility for their oppressive behavior, help to create an environment that encourages women gamers to participate, and present performances and videos to a non-MMO-informed public that is unaware that these communities exist.

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