Filed under Physical Space

Jason Bernagozzi, March 18 – 28, 2014

Terminal APSU

Jason Bernagozzi is a video, sound and new media artist living and working in upstate New York and is the co-founder of the experimental media arts non-profit Signal Culture. His work has been featured nationally and internationally at venues such as the European Media Arts Festival in Osnabruk, Germany, the LOOP Video Art Festival in Barcelona, Spain, the Beyond/In Western NY Biennial in Buffalo, NY, and the Yan Gerber International Arts Festival in Hebei Province, China. His work has received several awards including grants from the New York State Council for the Arts, free103point9 and the ARTS Council for the Southern Finger Lakes.

 

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Erik Austin Deerly, February 17 – March 7, 2014

Erik Austin Deerly

 

Erik Austin Deerly is an interdisciplinary artist and composer. He works with still and moving images, sound, and text to create visual and interactive work for print, web, performance, and installation. He also scores soundtracks for film, dance, and video.

Erik is co-founder of Burrdowning Press, an independent book & paper arts venture based in Indianapolis, Indiana. His work in art and design has earned a Webby nomination (1999), two Addy Awards (1988 & 1989), and a South by Southwest National Interactive Design Award (2002, first place). Erik’s visual art has been shown and reviewed nationally; his interactive and audio work has been seen and heard world-wide.

Erik holds a Master of Fine Arts in Interdisciplinary Arts & New Media from Columbia College Chicago and a Bachelor of Music in Composition from Northern Illinois University. Erik serves as Assistant Professor at Indiana University Kokomo.

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Doreen Maloney, February 3 – 14, 2014

Doreen Maloney - Terminal

 

Doreen LaMantia Maloney is currently Associate Professor of New Media at the University of Kentucky and is the former President and founding member of the New Media Caucus.

Her work has been shown internationally in Naples, Buenos Aires, Paris, Istanbul, and Havana, Soho Joyce Theater, the Tribeca Film Festival, Teknika Radica Festival, and on a tiny island called GolYazi, in western Turkey. Recently her videos and performances have been shown internationally at the Istanbul and Moscow Biennales and at a range of national galleries.

She holds degrees from Indiana University and the University of Wisconsin-Madison in German, Russian, and Turkish History as well as a MFA in Fine Arts.

Her primary training was in dance for the camera and narrative video shorts. Through developing the new media curriculum at Kentucky, her responsibilities and interests led her to teach a wide variety of courses and approaches.

She currently teaches video, installation, performance, web design, digital foundations and a range of advanced open media topical courses dealing with topics such as psychoanalysis and art and death and dying.

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Josh Fishburn, January 21 – 31, 2014

Josh Fishburn - Terminal

 

Josh Fisburn is a new media artist, game designer, and educator based in Whitewater, Wisconsin. He teaches as an Assistant Professor of Media Arts & Game Development in the Department of Communication at the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater.

His research focuses on videogames as creative expression, and he has presented and written on the connection between audio and visual movement in games, the expressive power of networks in games and art. His creative work aligns closely with these topics but manifests in a variety of media, from video and paper-based games to networked game installation.

His work has been shown at Plus Gallery in Denver, FILE 2008 and 2009 in São Paulo, Brazil,8-Bit Game People in Rio de Janeiro,Prospectives ’09 in Reno, Nevada, at the UW-Whitewater’s Play Expo, and at the 2012 Games+Learning+Society Conference‘s Art Exhibition.

 

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Mark Callahan, December 2 – 13, 2013

callahan-web

 

Mark Callahan is the Artistic Director of Ideas for Creative Exploration (ICE), an interdisciplinary initiative for advanced research in the arts at the University of Georgia, Associate Academic Director for Innovation in the Arts at the Willson Center for Humanities and Arts, and serves on the faculty of the Lamar Dodd School of Art. He is a graduate of Cranbrook Academy of Art and the Rhode Island School of Design, where he was a member of the European Honors Program in Rome, Italy.

Callahan’s work has evolved from a traditional printmaking background to experimental multimedia projects. He was commissioned to create a site-specific work for Video Culture: Three Decades of Video Art, a collaboration that joined the forces of eleven institutions in the metro Detroit area to examine video art and its impact on contemporary culture. His work has also been used in concert by R.E.M. as a large-scale video projection. He is the executive producer of AUX, an event and publication series devoted to experimental art in all forms. Internet Soul Portraits (I.S.P.) and 24 Hour Miss South Carolina are part of the Rhizome ArtBase at the New Museum of Contemporary Art in New York. Recent group exhibitions includeMemery: Imitation, Memory, and Internet Culture at the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art (MASS MoCA), You All Fell for My Act at MAMA: Showroom for Media and Moving Art in Rotterdam, and Game Change: Videogames as Art Medium and Inspiration at the Telfair Museum in Savannah, Georgia.

 

 

24hmsc

24 Hour Miss South Carolina

Project link: http://mazamedia.com/24/

In 2007, a teenage beauty pageant contestant made a thirty-second speech that became a media phenomenon, fueled by millions of views on the Internet and a brief but intense outpouring of parodies. 24 Hour Miss South Carolina appropriates directly from YouTube while paying homage to Douglas Gordon’s seminal 1993 installation, 24 Hour Psycho. Slowed, stretched, and silenced, the work repositions an object of short-lived attention and mass ridicule to an epic progression of still images. As the resonance of the original performance diminishes, 24 Hour Miss South Carolina silently plays on, carried to an obsessive extreme that invites fresh readings on the nature of celebrity, voyeurism, and entertainment.

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Ron Lambert, November 18 – 27, 2013

Ron Lambert - Terminal

 

Working mainly in video and sculpture, Ron Lambert investigates the intersection between psychology and the environment. He received his MFA from the School of Art and Design at Alfred University, and his BFA from the University of Connecticut. Ron is currently an assistant professor at Bloomsburg University. Ron’s work has been published in Shaping Space, Third Edition, and Color, Third Edition, both by Paul Zelanski as well as the show catalogue People Doing Strange Things With Electricity. Ron has shown in galleries nationally, including the Athens Institute for Contemporary Art in Georgia, Center on Contemporary Art in Seattle, Lexington Art League, the Housatonic Museum of Art in Connecticut, and several college and university galleries around the country. His videos have been screened internationally including the Crosstalk Video Festival in Budapest Hungary, and the Sanluan Yishu project in Beijing China. Ron’s work has won awards at Artworks Gallery in Hartford, Connecticut, and the Foundry Art Centre in St. Charles, Missouri. His work is in the Vascovitz collection, and in the collection of the Tacoma Art Museum. He is currently represented by Catherine Person Gallery in Seattle, WA.

 

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Robb Fladry, November 4 – 15

Robb Fladry - Terminal

 

Robb Fladry is a new media designer, artist and filmmaker working with video and sound alongside traditional techniques. He earned an MFA at the University of South Florida focusing on digital video + electronic arts and a BFA in studio art from Austin Peay State University.  He is currently the Head of Digital Media and Assistant Professor of Graphic Design at the Rocky Mountain College of Art + Design. He lives in Denver, Colorado with his wife Shelley and their two cats – Ambassador Vittles and Nibblets.

He has exhibited his video installations and live a/v performances nationally and internationally, including the Frist Center for the Visual Arts in Nashville, the BEA Festival for Media Arts in Las Vegas, Electronic Language International Festival FILE: Rio de Janeiro 2009 and FILE: Såo Paulo 2008.

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Josh Gumiela, October 21 – November 1, 2013

Josh Gumiela Terminal

 

Josh Gumiela is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Art at Austin Peay State University. His work often combines low and high technology with natural elements to create immersive interactive media installations and environments. He’s interested in themes of postmemory, diaspora, and displacement as well as matters of time and timelessness, privacy, open source culture, and the deconstruction/repurposing of archaic, discarded, and ubiquitous technology.

 

Anticipating Yesterday
Sound and water installation, 2013 (documentation)
4:38

Water slowly drips from a dilapidated ceiling and falls into a worn metal pan. The sound of each droplet hitting the pan is scattered into rhythmic echoes of the initial event. As more and more droplets are collected–no two events sound exactly alike–the sound gradually crescendos to a cacophonous cadence representing the inexorable march of decay and the human wish to ‘go back and do it again.’

The installation resets itself every few minutes, setting the stage for a new cycle that is always different from the one before. The sound is controlled by an MSP patch that recalls the sounds of the prior droplets and disrupts the rhythm each time a new drop hits the pan. Four speakers positioned in the room envelop the beholder in spatialized sound.

 

 

 

DeleopolisVideo and programming, 2013
10:00

Deleopolis is a video installation that explores the decay and detritus of architecture and urban infrastructure.

 

 

 

 

 

Entomogoria
Video and programming, 2013
7:42

 

Entomogoria uses abstract images of insects to playfully discover the precarious space that exists between fear and euphoria of the natural and increasingly technological world.

 

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Angela Washko “It’s Just Not Fair”, October 7 – 18, 2013

Angela Washko

 

Angela Washko ( a Terminal Award winner )is a New York based artist and facilitator devoted to mobilizing communities and creating new forums for discussions of feminism where they do not exist. These forums are created through actions, interventions, videos, and performances- sometimes in video games. She recently founded the Council on Gender Sensitivity and Behavioral Awareness in World of Warcraft.

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Heather D. Freeman, September 23 – October 4, 2013

Heather D. Freeman, Terminal

 

Heather D. Freeman is Associate Professor of Digital Media at the University of North Carolina – Charlotte where she teaches digital print, animation, video, installation and drawing. She grew in Skillman, New Jersey and was heavily influenced by her parents’ careers in the sciences. She holds a B.A. in Fine Art and German Studies from Oberlin College and an MFA in Studio Art from Rutgers University.  Previously, Freeman worked as an art director, graphic designer, editor and animator in New York and New Jersey.  She also taught art, graphic design and visual rhetoric since 2001 at various institutions including the University of Kentucky and Clemson University. Her work is regularly exhibited regionally and nationally and has appeared in international exhibitions in Canada, China, Cuba, Germany, Hungary, New Zealand, Sweden and Thailand.  More of her work can be viewed at EpicAnt.com and PersonalDemons.org.

 

 

Statement:

I was always interested in the language and symbolic forms of science and where these intersect with mythic, religious and popular iconographies. With the birth of my son Quinn in 2008, this interest shifted to the linguistic growth of children. As a two-year-old, my son’s language skills went through a developmental explosion, and I found myself cataloguing his verbal discoveries. I reinterpreted my son’s language-defined worldview by taking his interests (trucks, dinosaurs, owls, playgrounds, etc.) and translating them into my own concerns (sustainable energy, ecological diversity, social justice, etc.) These became portraits of my son’s shifting Weltanschauung.

My son’s language skills metamorphose as he grows. As his ability to express the world matures, so accrue his fascinations, from construction equipment to video games, from monsters to death. As his relationship to a complex society matures, my relationships as a mother also evolve.

I find myself investigating old interests (science, human history, popular culture) through the lens of motherhood, with all its self-doubts, flailing, and absurdity contrasted with deep assurance. My son’s growth constantly re-defines motherhood for me, just as the changing nature of childhood re-shapes my investigations of the non-familial world.

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