Filed under Terminal Awards

Terminal Award: reMIXmyRELIGION by Curt Cloninger

Terminal

Terminal and the Center of Excellence in the Creative Arts at Austin Peay State University are pleased to announce the launch of reMIXmyRELIGION by Curt Cloninger. Cloninger is a recipient of a 2014 – 2015 Terminal Award. The Terminal Award is granted annually to aid in the creation of new internet based artworks.

Cloninger’s Project Statement

playdamage.org is a multimedia journal I have kept since 2000. Each piece links to the next piece, in reverse chronological order.

For the TERMINAL award, I created the most recent playdamage page, #107.

reMIXmyRELIGION

The audio excerpt is from “I Feel Love” by Giorgio Moroder + Donna Summer. Moroder is playing a Moog synthesizer. The photos of the room and the drumset are by the Texas outsider musician Jandek. They are the cover images of seven of his albums. The text is from a conversation between Jerry Lee Lewis and his producer Sam Phillips. They are arguing about whether or not God can use rock & roll. The screeshots of the text are from a digitized VHS copy of Dan Graham’s video _Rock My Religion_, an art documentary about the relationship between American religion and American rock & roll. The face is my face, weeping, listening to Nirvana in my headphones. My face is aleatorically animated.

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Terminal Award: Bowling Rolling Pushing Tipping Trundling by Josh Hite

Josh Hite Termial

Terminal and the Center of Excellence in the Creative Arts at Austin Peay State University are pleased to announce the launch of Bowling Rolling Pushing Tipping Trundling  by Josh Hite. Hite is a recipient of a 2013 – 2014 Terminal Award. The Terminal Award is granted annually to four artists to help in the creation of new internet based artworks.

Bio

Josh Hite’s video and photo work is primarily concerned with human movement through local spaces.  He is inspired by the potential for the creation of subjective pathways and the myriad results that occur when movers decidedly confront obstacles.   Recent work focuses on the technological alteration of action and memory relative to the uploading of backyard behavior onto YouTube.  He has collaborated on site-specific projects, dance and sound performances, and work in public space.  Josh has a BA in Philosophy, an MFA in Visual Art and teaches photography and video at Emily Carr University of Art + Design and Arts Umbrella in Vancouver.

Artist Statement

Taking YouTube as source, Bowling Rolling Pushing Tipping Trundling is part of a series of works that archive, categorize, and reassemble audible human interventions into rural landscapes.  Counter to memories recorded in my youth, which were silently recorded as photos onto film, shared in person and maybe doubled at Kmart, these recordings are noisy, and they are documented with the knowledge that they might be liked, linked, playlisted and commented on, by friends and strangers. 

A few years ago I was alerted to Youtube’s transformation into a site primarily used for listening rather than viewing when asked by a few six and seven year olds why I would listen to music anywhere else online.  Despite the overwhelming intrusion of song titles upon searches and hefty gentrification, it still remains rich with documents of humans recording audio and video of their lives.

Erving Goffman, in his 1978 essay “Response Cries,” wrote extensively on types of sounds uttered in horseplay, mishaps, and daily life.  The recordings in this piece exude both audible glee and threat startles, with plenty of strain grunts preceding these selections.  For Goffman, “Response cries, then, do not mark a flooding of emotion outward, but a flooding of relevance in.”  These sounds complete narratives in ways that confirm for others present that what they think is happening is actually happening.

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Terminal Award: ZONE: Mutant Space Chernobyl by Atif Akin

Terminal - Mutant Space

 

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Terminal and the Center of Excellence in the Creative Arts at Austin Peay State University are pleased to announce the launch of ZONE: Mutant Space Chernobyl  by Atif Akin. Akin is a recipient of a 2013 – 2014 Terminal Award. The Terminal Award is granted annually to four artists to help in the creation of new internet based artworks.

Mutant Space is a large scope visual art project about nuclear power and radioactivity. Research consists of visual surveys around some power plants and research on radioactivity. The aims is to contemplate on politics through artistic practice. It crosses over multiple visual media and embodies as installation, online and book.

Atıf Akın is an artist, lecturer and designer living in New York. Recently he worked at Bilgi University and Kadir Has University in Istanbul. He is the founder and the organizer of PixelIST festival, dedicated to electronic arts and its subcultures, together with PixelACHE network. His work is listed in the ʻYounger Than Jesusʼ art directory project of New Museum, published by Phaidon. He also worked with xurban_collective at various international projects. He was one of the three co-curators of ʻUncharted: User Frames in Media Artsʼ exhibition and the chief editor of the catalog. Currently he is teaching at Mason Gross School of the Arts Visual Arts Department of Rutgers University in New Jersey.

Terminal Award: Drawing Circuits by Gottfried Haider

Drawing Circuits by Gottfried Haider

 

launch Drawing Circuits

Terminal and the Center of Excellence in the Creative Arts at Austin Peay State University are pleased to announce the launch of Drawing Circuits by Gottfried Haider. Haider is a recipient of a 2013 – 2014 Terminal Award. The Terminal Award is granted annually to four artists to help in the creation of new internet based artworks.

Drawing Circuits is a website that guides users to draw (electrical) circuit boards using their mouse or trackpad to free draw. Drawing Circuits juxtaposes the practice of drawing with the creation of circuitry. Haider is dealing with the largely hidden and undervalued nature of electronics in contemporary media art contexts. The site functions both as a facilitator for an experience, as well as a tool for the creation of circuit boards. The experience includes imagery, music and interventions, that bring elements from a drawing studio into the website. As a tool, the website allows users to export their drawings in a way that they can be easily machined into real copper clad boards ( using a CNC mill or a vinyl cutter).

 Gottfried Haider is a media artist born in Vienna. He studied Digital Arts at Vienna University of Applied Arts before joining UCLA’s Design Media Arts program on a Fulbright Scholarship. His work was awarded an Award of Distinction (2nd place) at Prix Ars Electronica 2004.

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Winners of the 13 – 14 Terminal Awards

Juror Greg J. Smith  has selected proposals from four artists for the 2013 – 2014 Terminal Awards. Projects by Gottfried Haider, Josh Hite, Frederick Witold Ostrenko, and Atif Akin were selected.

 

Juror Statement

In selecting the 2013 Terminal Awards recipients, proposals were evaluated based on the provocativeness and clarity of project outlines, the strength of related past work and the manner in which proposals directly engaged the internet, as a medium. The four selected proposals are listed below.

Gottfried Haider’s “Drawing Circuits” playfully proposes a rudimentary browser to 3D milling machine workflow through which visitors to a website can draw electronic circuits and then manufacture them. In conflating the sketchpad and the electronic enthusiast’s workbench this project promises to create both a social space and an educational tool.

Frederick Witold Ostrenko’s “Conglomeration” is a sharp critique of the carnivorous capitalism of Silicon Valley that will transform the logic of a crude game prototype into a First-person shooter (FPS). Ostrenko’s proposed game riffs on the informatics of gaming and the ubiquitous data streams and visualizations of financial markets.

Rather than plug work into the tedious trappings of stock web portfolio templates, Atif Akin’s “The Mutant Space” proposes a sincere rethinking of online photo archives. Utilizing Processing.js and experimenting with the capabilities of modern web browsers, this work promises to construct a dynamic space to exhibit the eerie non-place qualities of a collection of photographs documenting urban environments, frozen in time by the Chernobyl meltdown.

Delving into the world of vernacular video, Josh Hite promises to stitch together a video comprised of footage of ‘trundling’ – the rolling of rocks and boulders down hillsides. Curating a meditation on the essential qualities of landscape through YouTube footage might seem counterintuitive, but Hite’s past work demonstrates his capacity to identify and foreground strange idiosyncrasies and patterns, culled from the natural world.

Greg J. Smith February 2013

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Terminal Award: The Poor House Project by Angela Watters

Angela Watters - Terminal

 

launch The Poor House Project

Terminal and the Center of Excellence in the Creative Arts at Austin Peay State University are pleased to announce the launch of The Poor House Project by Angela Watters. Watters is a recipient of a 2012 – 2013 Terminal Award. The Terminal Award is granted annually to four artists to help in the creation of new internet based artworks.

 

The Poor House is a participatory art project organized by artist, Angela Watters.  Currently, the project is accepting submissions of student loan debt numbers from arts graduates. In the coming months personal invitations will be sent to well-known artists requesting a donation of a small work of art to decorate the interior of the gallery like interior of a $5 flea market dollhouse, or the Poor House, which will be transformed into a sculpture offered to collectors at the amount of collected student loan debt. The Poor House Project website compares debt collected with realized prices of paintings sold at auction. As the debt totals rise, the featured painting on the home page will change to a painting sold for a comparable amount.

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Terminal Award: Chastity by Angela Washko

Angela Washko - Terminal

 

project site

 

Terminal and the Center of Excellence in the Creative Arts at Austin Peay State University are pleased to announce the launch of Chastity and The Council on Gender Sensitivity and Behavioral Awareness in World of Warcraft by Angela Washko. Washko is the recipient of a 2012 – 2013 Terminal Award. The Terminal Award is granted annually to four artists to help in the creation of new internet based artworks.

 

 

ARTIST STATEMENT
Angela Washko

Mobilizing communities and using play, I am an artist and facilitator creating new forums for discussions of feminism where and when they do not exist. These forums are created through actions, interventions, videos, and performances- sometimes in video games. I am dedicated to researching and ultimately changing unhealthy, unrealistic, limited, and object-oriented projections of women throughout different forms of media by creating public works that challenge our implicit acceptance of everyday inequality.

My most recent project, “The Council on Gender Sensitivity and Behavioral Awareness In World of Warcraft,” is a long-term research-based initiative I launched to create spaces for dialogue about feminism inside a video game with a community that is notoriously misogynistic and aggressive toward women. I am interested in the unusual political space that evolves within WoW. It takes quite a lot of effort to ever break into the social aspects of the game. One has to make a fairly serious commitment to the game (undergoing lengthy tutorials, quests, learning characters’ skills, finding equipment, fighting dragons/goblins etc.) to ever make it to the point where they are in a guild and regularly communicating with large groups of people. Because of that barrier between the committed and the dabblers, a unique social community is created in each realm of World of Warcraft that few know about, despite the game’s widespread popularity. The blatant discrimination, homophobia, and extreme sexism that persist are not a result of the developers’ aesthetics, but the community of avatar-hidden individuals that play it. I am creating videos from performances inside of World of Warcraft that investigate the relationship between female players and the intensely complex social communities within WOW. I am working on instituting a system in which players in my community are forced to take responsibility for their oppressive behavior, help to create an environment that encourages women gamers to participate, and present performances and videos to a non-MMO-informed public that is unaware that these communities exist.

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Terminal Award: Facebook Demetricator by Benjamin Grosser

project site

Terminal and the Center of Excellence in the Creative Arts at Austin Peay State University are pleased to announce the launch of Facebook Demetricator by Benjamin Grosser. Grosser is the recipient of a 2012 – 2013 Terminal Award. The Terminal Award is granted annually to four artists to help in the creation of new internet based artworks.

Ben Grosser, Terminal

Project Statement:

The Facebook interface is filled with numbers. These numbers, or metrics, measure and present our social value and activity, enumerating friends, likes, comments, and more. Facebook Demetricator is a web browser addon that hides these metrics. No longer is the focus on how many friends you have or on how much they like your status, but on who they are and what they said. Friend counts disappear. ’16 people like this’ becomes ‘people like this’. Through changes like these, Demetricator invites Facebook’s users to try the system without the numbers, to see how their experience is changed by their absence. With this work I aim to disrupt the prescribed sociality these metrics produce, enabling a network society that isn’t dependent on quantification.

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Horror Stories by Jillian Mcdonald

Horror Stories by Jillian Mcdonald - Terminal

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Horror Stories is a web-based artwork that enables an interactive and collaborative film-making experience. The work is not a film per se, it is a contemporary update and visual equivalent to ghost stories told around a campfire. That everyone wants to shoot a horror film might be an exaggeration, but the genre’s signature low budgets, repetitive motifs, and minimal narratives make the feat possible for many amateurs and fans. In Horror Stories the viewer’s experience depends on his or her own expectations of horror films. Programming by Julie Gill.

SoyaBall by the WRMC Collaborative

Soya Ball, WRMC Collaborative, Terminal

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SoyaBall is an online fortune telling and fortune gathering site. Inspired by the popular Magic 8 Ball and Google’s auto-complete function, we seek to create a seemingly all-knowing device. Rooted in Dada and Surrealist games like the exquisite corpse and borrowing from notions of Oulipo poetry, SoyaBall juxtaposes two seemingly incongruous ideas through an extraction and recombination of data. The site takes gathered fortunes input by previous users and pairs them with questions asked by other users. SoyaBall questions the acquisition and distribution of how we find the answers to life’s questions. The site consists of two sections: one where participants ask a question and receive what the software perceives to be the best answer from the pool of available fortunes, the second section takes questions asked by previous users and asks new users to provide an answer. The two sections feed each other, as they have a cyclical relationship in generating content. Questions asked in one are answered in the other. SoyaBall is set up as a double-blind experiment in that the users are unaware that their questions and answers are feeding the disconnected databases.Users are limited to inquiry once a day to foster thoughtful questions and answers, as opposed to simply being a dumping ground for life’s less-challenging questions. SoyaBall puts technology, and specifically the internet, in the role of psychic figure as it offers the best answer based on the pool of information it has. Given the desire for most to simply jump online to find an answer, SoyaBall critiques the ways that we seek knowledge. SoyaBall lives online, but in our quest to blur the line between digital and physical space, the second phase of the project will involve constructing a portable device to take SoyaBall into public space. To spread knowledge of and access to SoyaBall, we will create and distribute QR codes that direct those with SmartPhones to a mobile version of the site. Users empower SoyaBall to give them definitive answers. SoyaBall playfully subverts our desire to find definitive answers and quench our uncertainty simply by taking any answer and labeling it as definitive.